coming up in Affiliateland in May 2019

Happy Spring!

ILLINOIS
Smithsonian Distinguished Scholar Dr. Richard Kurin will give a talk on the History of America in 101 Objects at the Peoria Riverfront Museum in Peoria, 5.2.

NATIONWIDE
11 Affiliates will collaborate with the National Museum of American History to present a National Youth Summit on Woman Suffrage: The Ballot and Beyond on 5.21. Thanks to the Arab American National Museum (Dearborn, MI); Cerritos Library (Cerritos, CA); Conner Prairie Interactive History Park (Fishers, IN); the Durham Museum (Omaha, NE); Heritage Farm Museum and Village (Huntington, WV); History Colorado (Denver, CO); International Storytelling Center (Jonesborough, TN); Ohio History Connection (Columbus, OH); The Witte Museum (San Antonio, TX); Upcountry History Museum (Greenville, SC); and UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures (San Antonio, TX).

TEXAS
The Frontiers of Flight Museum will open the Art of the Airport Tower exhibition from the National Air and Space Museum in Dallas, 5.13.

Kudos Affiliates!! April 2019

Congratulations to these Affiliates on their recent accomplishments! Do you have kudos to share? Please send potential entries to Aaron Glavas, GlavasC@si.edu.

FUNDING

Science Museum Oklahoma (Oklahoma City, OK) announced that Schlumberger will provide a matching grant of $90,000 to help renovate the museum’s energy exhibit, Energy Quest. Energy Quest will feature more than 2,000 square feet of space and provide an immersive environment to explore the science, technology, engineering, and math associated with energy production in Oklahoma.

The Baltimore Orioles announced plans to honor the legacy of Hall of Famer Frank Robinson during the 2019 season by donating $20,000 to the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture (Baltimore, MD) to highlight the achievements of African Americans throughout our nation’s history.

Public Service Co. of Oklahoma announced a $250,000 grant from the American Electric Power Foundation to help the Stafford Air & Space Museum (Weatherford, OK) reach its Legacy Campaign goal. The money raised during the campaign will fund a planned 18,000-square-foot expansion of the museum. Plans include expanding existing exhibit galleries, the addition of new galleries, and renovations to STEM classrooms and work areas.

The Detroit Tigers and the Arab American National Museum (Dearborn, MI) announced a special event- Arab American Night. The special night will take place on Aug. 6 at Comerica Park in Detroit. The evening is sponsored by Tigers partner Saad Wholesale Meats and $3 from every ticket sold as part of the promotion will be used to support the museum.

Sunderland Foundation has awarded Union Station, Kansas City, Inc. (Kansas City, MO) a multi-year grant of $1.5 million in support of Science City’s Early Learning Expansion Project.  The programmatic footprint will fill more than 35,000 square feet and include multiple exhibit zones and interactive experiences to spark curiosity and creativity in Kansas City’s youngest learners.

AWARDS & RECOGNITION

A small yet mighty new dinosaur was recently discovered thanks to the work of Lindsay Zanno, head of paleontology at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, and her team. The new dinosaur — Moros intrepidus, which means “harbinger of doom” after the Greek god Moros — is a relative of the much larger Tyrannosaurus rex, and is the oldest Cretaceous tyrannosaur species discovered in North America.

Warren Washington, a senior scientist from National Center for Atmospheric Research, managed by University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (Boulder, CO), won the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, considered the “Nobel Prize For The Environment.” He will share the honor and the $200,000 award, with climate scientist Michael Mann, director of the Earth Systems Science Center at Pennsylvania State University.

The Institute of Museum and Library Services announced 30 finalists for the 2019 National Medal for Museum and Library Service including two Affiliates-El Pueblo History Museum (Pueblo, CO), part of History Colorado, and Orange County Regional History Center (Orlando, FL). The National Medal is the nation’s highest honor given to museums and libraries for community service.

LEADERSHIP CHANGES

Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals (Hillsboro, OR) announced Board Member Garret Romaine will serve as interim director. Previous director Julian Gray stepped down and will continue at the museum as a curator and exhibition planner.

The Arab American National Museum announced Dr. Diana Abouali will become the new director of the museum in April. Dr. Abouali becomes the third director of AANM.

The Connecticut Historical Society, has named Robert Kret, former director of The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, as the museum’s new CEO. Robert will begin his position in May.

75th Anniversary of D-Day Smithsonian Material Culture Forum Webcast

Watch the live webcast of the Smithsonian Material Culture Forum on Monday, May 13, 4-6 pm! See below for the event schedule.

From its grand strategy to the personal stories of individual soldiers, the history of D-Day remains a captivating and rich story. To usher in the 75th anniversary of the battle, the Smithsonian presents, “Forgotten Voices, Forgotten Objects,” a forum exploring avenues of historical inquiry, highlights of Smithsonian and non-Smithsonian collections, and expert research on the topic. RSVP for the webcast here.

112th Meeting of the Smithsonian Material Culture Forum

75th Anniversary of D-Day: Forgotten Voices, Forgotten Objects

Monday, May 13, 2019, 4–6 p.m. EDT

INTRODUCTION
Michelle Delaney, Senior Program Officer for History and Culture, Smithsonian Office of the Provost and Under Secretary for Museums, Education, and Research and Todd Kinser, Chief of Exhibit Planning, Smithsonian Exhibits

WELCOME
Susan Ades, Director, Smithsonian Exhibits

MODERATOR
Richard B. Frank, a lawyer and military historian, has written several books and articles on the Pacific Campaign of World War II, including Guadalcanal: The Definitive Account of the Landmark Battle (1990), Downfall: The End of the Imperial Japan Empire (1999), and MacArthur (2007).

SPEAKERS (View the program booklet here)
Kate Clarke Lemay, Ph.D, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Gratitude, Trauma and Repression: D-Day in French and American Collective Memory

Frank A. Blazich, Jr., Ph.D, Curator, Modern Military History, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
The Magic Boxes of D-Day: How One Humble Invention Helped Make Operation Neptune Possible

Laura Oviedo, Ph.D, ABD, Smithsonian Fellow, Division of Armed Forces, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Belonging in War and Nation: Latina/os & World War II

Krewasky A. Salter, Ph.D, (Guest) Associate Curator, National Museum of African American History & Culture, Smithsonian Institution
African Americans, D-Day and World War II

Rebecca Head Trautmann, Project Curator, National Native American Veterans Memorial, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution; Herman J. Viola, PhD., Senior Advisor, National Native American Veterans Memorial, and Curator Emeritus, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution
National Native American Veterans Memorial

Megan Harris, Reference Specialist, Veterans History Project, Library of Congress
“I Hardly Know Where to Start”: Personal Narratives of D-Day within Veterans History Project Collections

Greg Elder, Chief Historian, Office of Corporate Communications, Defense Intelligence Agency
Intelligence Support to Operation OVERLORD

Jeremy R. Kinney, Ph.D, Curator, Aeronautics Department, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution
Flak-Bait: A Story of Survival from World War II

Shannon Perich, Curator, Photographic History Collection, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Exploring Robert Capa’s Iconic D-Day Photographs

Q&A—Moderator: Richard Frank, Historian

The Material Culture Forum was organized in 1988 with a mission of maintaining the sense of a scholarly community throughout the Smithsonian museums, libraries, and research and cultural centers.  The Forum considers topics from the vast world of objects that the Smithsonian collects, preserves, studies, and presents.

the Moon is rising in Affiliateland in April 2019

Great events at Affiliates as spring starts blooming!

NORTH CAROLINA
The National Air and Space Museum has loaned three Apollo-related artifacts for the exhibition One Giant Leap: North Carolina and the Space Race opening at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, 4.5.

WASHINGTON
Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission exhibition, organized by the National Air and Space Museum and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, will open at the Museum of Flight in Seattle, 4.13.

ILLINOIS
As part of the Smithsonian Year of Music, the DuSable Museum of African American History will host A Celebration of Ella!!, a tribute event honoring the music and legacy of Ella Jenkins. At 94, Jenkins is one of the most revered singers and songwriters of the past century, with dozens of albums released through Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, in Chicago, 4.13.

PENNSYLVANIA
A protest armband from the 1960s, on loan from the National Museum of American History, will be part of the The Vietnam War: 1945-1975 exhibition at the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh, 4.13.


NEW YORK

Katherine Ott, curator at the National Museum of American History, delivers the last talk of the Questioning Identity lecture series, Poking at Normal: Museums and the History of Real People  at the Rockwell Museum in Corning, 4.24.

WASHINGTON, D.C.
Teens from five Affiliate communities will visit Washington with museum staff and parents, to meet with Smithsonian Secretary David Skorton and participate in person in the final meeting of the Secretary’s Youth Advisory Council. Thanks to the Rockwell Museum, Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, the Arab American National Museum, and the Upcountry History Museum, for helping us to include national teen voices in the work of the Smithsonian over the last two years!, in D.C.,  4.24.

IOWA
Smithsonian Affiliations Director Myriam Springuel and National Outreach Manager Aaron Glavas will participate in the affiliation announcement at new affiliate, the National Czech & Slovak Museum & Library in Cedar Rapids, 4.26.

MASSACHUSETTS
Astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory will present the April talk Moon Race: The U.S.-Soviet Competition to Put a Human on the Moon as part of the year-long Moon Landing in Context lecture series at Framingham State University in Framingham, 4.27.

 

Using Artifacts to Inspire Critical Thinking

This article has been re-posted from the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access page. It was written by Mary Manning, College and Career Readiness Specialist, at Cleveland History Center of the Western Reserve Historical Society, a Smithsonian Affiliate in Ohio.

You don’t need to be a museum curator to use artifacts in a classroom. If you decide to use visual thinking strategies, which offer powerful ways to unravel all the symbolic power of artistic images, they may not seem to apply to artifacts, especially those used in daily life that may not carry symbolic meanings. However, artifacts are the most often forgotten yet most compelling kind of primary source—they may not tell us a story in words and figures, but they can lead us down trails of questions that can stimulate critical thinking and research in the classroom.

Sasaki Family Photograph, 1960.

Sasaki Family Photograph, 1960.
Members of the Sasaki family are shown in their kitchen, preparing the actual cakes and treats that were made from the sticky mashed rice created in the mochi barrel. Cleveland History Center.

Making Sense of Mochi

When I began to design a Learning Lab collection that featured Asian Pacific American stories from the Cleveland History Center’s collections, I found one such compelling artifact—a mochi barrel used by the Sasakis, a Japanese-American family that lived in Cleveland, Ohio. At around two feet tall, our mochi barrel is a deceptively heavy contraption of wood curved around the cement dish inside. Inside the lid, a series of Japanese characters confirms that the barrel  was made in Cleveland in 1947. I became fascinated by this object, so I began exploring its history through all the questions that it brought to my mind.

First, who was the Sasaki family? How did they come to Cleveland? I knew that much of Cleveland’s Japanese population arrived during World War II, and indeed, after being interned on the west coast, they were placed in Cleveland through the local War Relocation Authority office and efforts of local churches. Telling the story of the Sasakis and their mochi barrel meant combing through these local records, seeking references to the specific family or to situations that mirrored their experience. I also realized that I couldn’t explain how the barrel was used.

After some searching, I learned that making mochi could be a very intensive process, but one that has persisted through centuries of Japanese New Year celebrations. Telling the story of the mochi barrel then became about the process and science behind its function. The more I learned the more I saw these lines of questioning coming together: I wondered if their oppressive experience in internment camps made even more important to preserve cultural rituals like mochi making in their lives.

Questioning Through Artifacts

If you ever find one compelling object or image, don’t hesitate to bring it into your classroom, and use it to build out a lesson. Students are curious; when you let them observe an object for some time, and then ask what they see, they often respond with questions that cut to the core of why the object exists in the first place. They are often able to intuit the purpose of an unfamiliar object from what they already know. They can use their questions as a guide to research the historical context that fills in gaps of knowledge about the object and, potentially, creates more questions. In this process, there doesn’t always have to be just one story—strands of history inherently relate because they all tie back to that one original object.

Through this process, students seek a holistic view of an artifact or image, weighing information for value and bias and how it does or does not fit into the object’s story.  There may be no bad questions, but there are certainly deeper questions that lead to higher-quality answers. By pushing students to question what they see through an intensive engagement with a single object, you hone a process of learning to interpret and draw meaning that enhances the way that students view the world around them. The Sasaki family and their mochi barrel provide the perfect example of why these skills serve students so well. The Sasakis do not play a role in any of the great triumphs and magnificent failures that would characterize a history of Cleveland in the twentieth century, but the ways in which they experienced internment and remade their lives tell us much about what is possible to find in between the events in our history books.

The Cleveland History Center is a Smithsonian Affiliate museum that collaborated on the Teacher Creativity Studio program. This program received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Coming up in Affiliateland in March 2019

Congratulations to Affiliates on these great programs!

NEBRASKA
The Durham Museum opens American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith, a SITES exhibition, on 3.2. National Museum of American History curator Dr. Barbara Clark Smith will deliver a public talk on her new book about resistance in revolutionary America in Omaha, 3.5.

RHODE ISLAND
National Museum of American History curator Dr. Claire Jerry will present a talk on Woman Suffrage with the Rhode Island Historical Society in Providence, 3.7.

NEW YORK
Mary Elliott, curator at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, will deliver the keynote address at the Long Island Museum‘s day-long symposium, Surviving Slavery on Long Island in Stony Brook, 3.9.

Diana N’Diaye of the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage will give a talk on the Will to Adorn: Stories of African American Dress and Identity project as part of the Questioning Identity lecture series at the Rockwell Museum in Corning, 3.27.

FLORIDA
The Mennello Museum of American Art opens the Art of the Airport Tower exhibition from the National Air and Space Museum, in Orlando, 3.14.

MASSACHUSETTS

photograph

President Kennedy with VonBraun

Dr. Michael Neufeld, curator at the National Air and Space Museum, will present a lecture titled Space Hero or Nazi Villain? The Life of Wernher von Braun as part of the Moon Landing in Context project at Framingham State University in Framingham, 3.28.